Reading Roundup

Summer is now long past but I haven’t as yet resumed painting toy soldiers and I don’t have much inclination to do so at the moment. However, I have acquired some new books over the past few months. The first of these was “Great Military Disasters from Bannockburn to Stalingrad” by Julian Spilsbury. It proved to be an accessible read that gives some interesting perspectives on how great military disasters arise. While the causes prove to be many, good old human incompetence tops the list. Of course the book equally demonstrates how great victories were achieved by the opposing forces, and it certainly proves what a perilous undertaking it is committing your forces to battle.

Great Military Disasters

Next on my list of new books is “Wargaming an Introduction” by Neil Thomas. As the name suggests it provides an introduction to wargaming the major periods from Ancients to WW2. It also provides some excellent rules for gaming each of those. I read this book some nine years ago when I borrowed it from the local library. I enjoyed reading the book then and appreciated the elegance of the rules. The book still stands up as an enjoyable read and rules are still well-designed even all these years later.

I was prompted to buy “Wargaming an Introduction” after reading some online reviews of the WW2 rules it contained. I had been looking for a set of WW2 rules that weren’t too tortuous to play. I have played the WW2 rules contained in “One Hour Wargames” by Neil Thomas and enjoyed them immensely but I wanted to try something that could handle larger and more varied forces. I haven’t as yet used the “Wargaming an Introduction” WW2 rules but I look forward to doing so.

Wargaming an Introduction

“The Battles of Tolkien” by David Day I picked up in a local bookshop. It is a beautiful book to behold with its many gorgeous illustrations and faux tooled leather cover. The book came plastered with the warning “This work is unofficial and is not authorized by the Tolkien Estate or HarperCollins Publishers”. However, it proved an interesting read that more addressed what inspired Tolkien’s depictions of warfare in Middle Earth than an analysis of the weapons and structure of the forces involved. More care should have been taken in the preparation and production of the text in “The Battles of Tolkien” as there are some issues with its clarity and typography. The battle maps could also have been clearer. Despite that, the book is a handy reference and would bejewel any bookshelf.

Battles of Tolkien

My most recent acquisition is “The Soldier” by Chris McNab and was procured from ABE Books for a tiny sum. I bought this book after reading a very comprehensive review of it on the Man of Tin blog. The edition I have was only published last year and is very up to date. The book endeavours to describe the personal experiences of soldiers from the Seven Years War to present conflicts. It is a really well put together book filled with useful information and excellent illustrations and detailed colour plates of uniformed soldiers. It is best described as an “Eyewitness Guide” style book for adults.

The Soldier

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A Few Old Books

I was fortunate to recently receive a voucher for a second hand bookstore that gave me the opportunity to add to my library of books on military history for a very small sum indeed. My purchase included “Armies of the Napoleonic Era” by Otto von Pivka (the nom de plume of well-known author Digby Smith) and “Weapons & Equipment of the Napoleonic Wars” by Philip Haythornthwaite. Despite their age, both of these books provide an absolute mine of information regarding the weapons, equipment and tactics of the various combatants of the Napoleonic Wars. My other second hand purchase was a copy of “Renaissance Armies 1480-1650” by George Gush. Although published in 1975 it is also a really useful book that, unsurprisingly, outlines the tactics, dress and equipment of Renaissance armies.

Renaissance Armies by George Gush

Renaissance Armies by George Gush

Weapons  and Equipment of the Napoleonic Wars by Philip Haythornthwaite

Weapons and Equipment of the Napoleonic Wars by Philip Haythornthwaite

Armies of the Napoleonic Era by Otto von Pivka (Digby Smith)

Armies of the Napoleonic Era by Otto von Pivka (Digby Smith)